Switching to Opera


When I first started using it, Google’s Chrome browser seemed like a huge leap forward: a thread for each open tab, what’s not to like about that?

Latterly, though it has felt more and more like a drag: run it for any length of time and your computer will thrash or even freeze as it is such a poor manager of resources and/or a major leaker of memory.

The answer, so I have read, is to use Opera – so that is what I am doing. Will report on progress in a few weeks.

How to get a job as a developer


Usage share of web browsers (excluding IE) acc...

Last night I went to a Birkbeck training session for prospective mentors. I did not realise before I turned up that all, or almost all, the would-be mentors would be MSc Computer Science graduates.

In the end that fact alone turned what could have been a pretty dull way to spend a Friday night into something quite interesting – I don’t get to talk to developers very often at all, and now I was in a room full of them.

And one of them – a chief executive of a start-up with a fascinating back-story (but he didn’t say ‘put that on your blog’, so I won’t) – told me what he regards as the best way for a would be developer to get their breakthrough job: go to github, find a high profile project from a commercial outfit (he suggested the Chrome browser from Google) and fix a few bugs.

His claim was that he knew several people – including two with jobs at Google – who had got work in this way. I have no reason to think he was doing anything other than telling the truth.

Interestingly, he was pretty surprised when I talked about the poor employment record of computer science graduates – there plainly is some sort of disconnect between the firms recruiting (who say they struggle to fill jobs) and the graduates (who struggle to get recruited).

Time to ditch Firefox?


The results of the Acid3 test on Google Chrome 4.0
Image via Wikipedia

Just about every internet user, even if they have never used Firefox, owes the Mozilla Foundation an enormous amount for the creation of Firefox.

It’s injection of competition back into the mass browser market stimulated a new drive towards standards and speed that has made a huge difference to all users: Internet Explorer 6 came out in 2001 and languished, largely unimproved until Firefox’s success finally prompted a new version of IE, in 2006 and since then competition has been fierce.

But is Firefox really up to it any more? I have just tried the javascript bench marks on http://jsbenchmark.celtickane.com and my copy of Firefox (it is still my browser of choice at home) scored just 89 on average over 10 runs. Google Chrome managed 313 on the same box (a now quite old Pentium D).

And, of course, Chrome is more standards compliant. It doesn’t quite smoothly progress to 100/100 on the Acid 3 test – but it does get there, while my version of Firefox only manages 94/100.