Springer and Scala


I need to learn the Scala programming language. Unfortunately the University of York’s library does not seem to have an electronic copy of “Programming in Scala” (Amazon link) but it did have an electronic copy of  Springer’s “A Beginner’s Guide to Scala” (Amazon link). But this is a very poor book, referring back to examples that don’t exist, offering a very confusing explanation as to what object-orientation is and, to cap it all, illustrating examples with pseudo code rather than Scala itself.

Of course, it’s not the worst example you’ll find from Springer – “Unleash the System on Chip using FPGAs…” is easily the worst book I have ever seen in print (see my review on Amazon here) – and, of course they also publish many useful books and conference proceedings and so on. But they appear to have close to a monopoly on many aspects of computer science publications and use that ruthlessly.

If it wasn’t for other factors I’d suggest the European Commission needs to take a close look at them. Hardly worth it in the UK’s case these days though.

Is Groovy back in fashion?


Last year I was taught “Object Orientated Design and Programming” as part of my Birkbeck MSc, using Groovy, a dynamic functional language built on top of Java and running on the Java VM.

I enjoyed it and liked Groovy – I went on to write some pieces of software for my MSc project using it.

But it also gave the impression of being a dying language and there were some complaints from fellow students who thought C# or Java itself would have been a better bet for them jobs wise (to which one of the lecturers responded with admirable chutzpah with a suggestion of using Lisp in the future).

This last week I have again been dabbling in Groovy and I get a sense that the language is suddenly back in fashion and its community of users seems more energy charged than a year ago.

Nothing scientific to back that feeling up with, just my judgement.