A RISC-V single board computer


I finally have a RISC-V based single board computer (SBC) – the Nezha from RV Boards shipped to me directly from China.

It’s tiny (about the same form-factor as a Raspberry Pi though) and relatively expensive (it cost me just over £100 to order and get it shipped here) but whilst I was slightly concerned I was being a bit naïve in buying it (as it was either a scam or it wouldn’t work), it boots (slowly) into Linux (see image) and works (slowly).

Can RISC-V cores (which are ‘open source hardware’ and free from licensing fees) break ARM’s grip on SBCs and similar devices? A year ago the answer looked like a very clear negative as, despite years of hype, RISC-V designs just weren’t moving off the page and into silicon. Now it looks much more uncertain as the Nezha is actually the second RISC-V SBC to ship (the other, the Beagle-V, has only been distributed to a select group of developers so far – and this didn’t include me despite my application – but is expected to be available globally in the autumn).

The plans are for RISC-V SBCs retailing for less than $20 inside a year and – crucially – for the RISC-V cores to feature vector extensions which could mean some interesting use-cases being opened up.

(If you want to know more about RISC-V or if you are thinking of starting a RISC-V assembly project I cannot recommend The RISC-V Reader highly enough.)

Right now I am trying to get Riscyforth to run on my machine.