Back to neural networks

Neural networks have fascinated me for a long time, though I’ve never had much luck applying them.

Back in the early and mid 1990s the UK’s trade and industry department ran a public promotional programme to industry about NNs and I signed up, I even bought a book about how to build them in C++ (and I read it, though I have to confess my understanding was partial).

My dream then was to apply the idea to politics: as a more effective way of concentrating resources on key voters. My insight was that, when out doing what political parties then called “canvassing” and now – largely for less than fully honest legal reasons as far as I can see – call “voter ID” (in electoral law “canvassing” i.e., seeking to persuade someone to vote one way is more highly regulated than simply “identifying” how they intend to vote) you could quite often tell how someone would respond to you even before they opened the door. There was some quality that told you, you were about to knock on a Labour voter’s door.

I still don’t know what that quality is – and after the recent election I’m not sure the insight applies any more any way – but the point was that if you could take a mass of data and have the NN find the function for you, then you could improve your chances of getting to your potential support and so on…

But I never wrote any code and NNs seemed to go out of fashion.

Now, renamed “machine learning”, they are back in fashion in a big way and my interest has been revived. But I am not trying to write any code that will work for politics.

Instead I am exploring whether I can write any code that will look at a music score and play it back. (This probably a silly idea as a start NN project, as music is not easy to decipher in any way as far as I can see).

I have read another book on C++ and neural networks (and even understood it): an ancient tome from the previous time NNs were in fashion.

The first task is to actually identify which bits of scribbling on the page are musical notation at all. And I have written some code to build a training set for that – here. It might well be of use to you if you need to mark bits of a JPEG as “good” or “bad” for some other purpose, so please do get in touch if you need some help with that.

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