Delays in a binary memory tree queue


This is a bit niche, but I spent a fair bit of this weekend working out what the algorithm to calculate how long a memory request packet would take to traverse a binary tree (from a leaf to the root) was. And now I have written a Groovy script (testable in your browser at https://groovyconsole.appspot.com/script/5109475228778496 – click on ‘edit’ and then ‘run’) to calculate the results.

(I am sure that this has been done before – many times – but I couldn’t find the algorithm on a quick search and then the desire to solve this myself took over).

The problem is this: memory request packets enter the tree at a leaf, they then have to cross a series of multiplexors until they reach the root (which is where the tree interfaces with the memory supply). Each multiplexor (mux) has two inputs and one output, so taken together the muxes form a binary tree.

As request packets could arrive at the leaves of a mux at the same time, there has to be a decision procedure about which packet progresses and which is delayed. The simple choice is to favour packets on either the left or the right leaf (in my case I went with the right). The question is then what is the average and maximum delay for a request packet.

So, if you muck about with the script you’ll see that the absolute maximum delay on a 256 leaf tree (eg., on a Bluetree memory tree connected to a 256 tile NoC) is 495 cycles, while the average maximum delay (ie for a leaf in the middle of the tree) is 248 cycles.

In contrast if the load is just 1% then these figures fall to about 3 and 1.5.

There is a flaw here though – because this all assumes that no new packets enter the system while the original request packet is traversing it – but in a dynamic system, even with a load as low as 1%, this is highly unlikely – packets that enter the tree “to the right” of the original request could potentially add to the delay if they chain with packets already present.

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Springer and Scala


I need to learn the Scala programming language. Unfortunately the University of York’s library does not seem to have an electronic copy of “Programming in Scala” (Amazon link) but it did have an electronic copy of  Springer’s “A Beginner’s Guide to Scala” (Amazon link). But this is a very poor book, referring back to examples that don’t exist, offering a very confusing explanation as to what object-orientation is and, to cap it all, illustrating examples with pseudo code rather than Scala itself.

Of course, it’s not the worst example you’ll find from Springer – “Unleash the System on Chip using FPGAs…” is easily the worst book I have ever seen in print (see my review on Amazon here) – and, of course they also publish many useful books and conference proceedings and so on. But they appear to have close to a monopoly on many aspects of computer science publications and use that ruthlessly.

If it wasn’t for other factors I’d suggest the European Commission needs to take a close look at them. Hardly worth it in the UK’s case these days though.