Is Groovy dying?

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English: Logo of the Groovy project

English: Logo of the Groovy project (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

A few years ago, on my Computer Science MSc, there was something of a mini-revolt as some of the students – already working as developers – complained that the object-orientated design course was being taught in Groovy – a JVM-based language that, in effect, is a dynamic extension of static Java. They said there were no jobs in Groovy so why were we being taught that?

I wasn’t one of them. I wasn’t (and I am not) working as a developer and so Groovy, which crossed the boundaries between Java’s imperative and Scala‘s functional approaches was interesting and powerfully expressive. But, yes, it was a bit of a niche.

I have come back to Groovy now because, for my PhD, I want to write a more powerful and dynamic NoC simulation than has proved possible in C++. Groovy has the tools – especially closures – that allow the writing of good DSLs and so was a natural choice.

But the Groovy landscape seems barren. As I write I haven’t been able to make any progress on my code because it seems a Java update broke Groovy support and, because the infrastructure for Groovy support through http://groovy-lang.org appears to have collapsed.

I have asked a question on Stack Overflow:
http://stackoverflow.com/questions/37363077/groovy-eclipse-reporting-bug-following-java-update but traffic is light.