After paging?

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Diagram of relationship between the virtual an...

Diagram of relationship between the virtual and physical address spaces. (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

Paging and virtual memory is at the heart of just about any computing device – more complex than a DVD player – we use everyday.

Paging is the memory management system based on the idea that we can divide the real memory of our computer into a sequence of smallish (typically 4,096 bytes) of “page frames” and then load the bits of data and program in and out of those frames (in “pages”) as we need them.

So, you can have pages from various different running programs in the page frames at any given time and then use a “virtual memory” system to map the pages placed in an arbitrary frame to the memory address the program thinks the page should be resident in.

It is not the only system we could use – “segments”, which involve moving large chunks (as opposed to small pages) of memory about is one approach, while “overlays” – using part of the memory space as sort of scratchpad working area – is another. More recently, with bigger “traditional” computers very large pages have been used as a way of making, at least in theory, more efficient use of memory now measured in billions (as opposed to a few tens) of bytes.

But paging is easily the most widely used approach and has been integral to the development of “multitasking” and similar shared resources approaches to computing – because paging allows us to just have the useful bits of a program and its data in memory we can have many more programs “running” at a given time.

But my PhD research is pointing me towards some of the weaknesses of the paging approach.

At the heart of the case for paging is the idea of “locality” in a computer’s use of resources: if you use one memory address at one instant there is a high probability you will use a nearby address very soon: think of any sort of sequential document or record and you can see why that idea is grounded in very many use cases of computing devices.

Locality means that it ought to make sense to read in memory in blocks and not just one little drop at a time.

But this principle may be in opposition to efficient usage of memory when competition for space in fierce: such as for the limited local memory resources we have on a Network-on-Chip computer.

Right now I am collecting data to measure the efficiency of 4k pages on such (simulated) devices. With 16 simulated cores trying to handle up to 18 threads of execution competition for pages is intense and the evidence suggests that they are resident, in some cases at least, for many fewer “ticks” than it takes to load them from the next lowest level in the memory hierarchy. On top of that many pages show that the principle of locality can be quite a weak one – pages of code are, in general, quite likely to demonstrate high locality (especially in loops) but pages of read-write memory may not.

I don’t have all the data to hand – essentially I am transforming one 200GB XML file into another XML file which will likely be around the same size and that takes time, even on quite a high spec computer (especially when you have to share resources with other researchers). But I expect some interesting results.

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