Tag Archives: Linux

Help needed: what is making the wireless card on my Raspberry Pi crash


Here’s the syslog from my Raspberry Pi this morning:


Jan 8 06:25:15 raspberrypi /USR/SBIN/CRON[10042]: (CRON) info (No MTA installed, discarding output)
Jan 8 06:25:30 raspberrypi dhclient: DHCPREQUEST on br0 to 192.168.62.1 port 67
Jan 8 06:25:30 raspberrypi dhclient: DHCPACK from 192.168.62.1
Jan 8 06:25:31 raspberrypi dhclient: bound to 192.168.62.104 -- renewal in 373 seconds.
Jan 8 06:31:43 raspberrypi dhclient: DHCPREQUEST on br0 to 192.168.62.1 port 67
Jan 8 06:31:43 raspberrypi dhclient: DHCPACK from 192.168.62.1
Jan 8 06:31:43 raspberrypi dhclient: bound to 192.168.62.104 -- renewal in 405 seconds.
Jan 8 06:38:28 raspberrypi dhclient: DHCPREQUEST on br0 to 192.168.62.1 port 67
Jan 8 06:38:28 raspberrypi dhclient: DHCPACK from 192.168.62.1
Jan 8 06:38:28 raspberrypi dhclient: bound to 192.168.62.104 -- renewal in 376 seconds.
Jan 8 06:44:44 raspberrypi dhclient: DHCPREQUEST on br0 to 192.168.62.1 port 67
Jan 8 06:44:44 raspberrypi dhclient: DHCPACK from 192.168.62.1
Jan 8 06:44:44 raspberrypi dhclient: bound to 192.168.62.104 -- renewal in 415 seconds.
Jan 8 06:49:58 raspberrypi hostapd: wlan0: STA 7c:61:93:ff:98:0c IEEE 802.11: authentication OK (open system)
Jan 8 06:49:58 raspberrypi hostapd: wlan0: STA 7c:61:93:ff:98:0c MLME: MLME-AUTHENTICATE.indication(7c:61:93:ff:98:0c, OPEN_SYSTEM)
Jan 8 06:49:58 raspberrypi hostapd: wlan0: STA 7c:61:93:ff:98:0c MLME: MLME-DELETEKEYS.request(7c:61:93:ff:98:0c)
Jan 8 06:49:58 raspberrypi hostapd: wlan0: STA 7c:61:93:ff:98:0c IEEE 802.11: authenticated
Jan 8 06:49:58 raspberrypi hostapd: wlan0: STA 7c:61:93:ff:98:0c IEEE 802.11: association OK (aid 1)
Jan 8 06:49:58 raspberrypi hostapd: wlan0: STA 7c:61:93:ff:98:0c IEEE 802.11: associated (aid 1)
Jan 8 06:49:58 raspberrypi hostapd: wlan0: STA 7c:61:93:ff:98:0c MLME: MLME-ASSOCIATE.indication(7c:61:93:ff:98:0c)
Jan 8 06:49:58 raspberrypi hostapd: wlan0: STA 7c:61:93:ff:98:0c MLME: MLME-DELETEKEYS.request(7c:61:93:ff:98:0c)
Jan 8 06:51:11 raspberrypi NetworkManager[2774]: <warn> Could not get scan request result: Did not receive a reply. Possible causes include: the remote application did not send a reply, the message bus security policy blocked the reply, the reply timeout expired, or the network connection was broken.
Jan 8 06:51:39 raspberrypi dhclient: DHCPREQUEST on br0 to 192.168.62.1 port 67
Jan 8 06:51:39 raspberrypi dhclient: DHCPACK from 192.168.62.1
Jan 8 06:51:40 raspberrypi dhclient: bound to 192.168.62.104 -- renewal in 373 seconds.
Jan 8 06:52:11 raspberrypi NetworkManager[2774]: <warn> Could not get scan request result: Did not receive a reply. Possible causes include: the remote application did not send a reply, the message bus security policy blocked the reply, the reply timeout expired, or the network connection was broken.
Jan 8 06:53:11 raspberrypi NetworkManager[2774]: <warn> Could not get scan request result: Did not receive a reply. Possible causes include: the remote application did not send a reply, the message bus security policy blocked the reply, the reply timeout expired, or the network connection was broken.
Jan 8 06:54:11 raspberrypi NetworkManager[2774]: <warn> Could not get scan request result: Did not receive a reply. Possible causes include: the remote application did not send a reply, the message bus security policy blocked the reply, the reply timeout expired, or the network connection was broken.
Jan 8 06:55:11 raspberrypi NetworkManager[2774]: <warn> Could not get scan request result: Did not receive a reply. Possible causes include: the remote application did not send a reply, the message bus security policy blocked the reply, the reply timeout expired, or the network connection was broken.
Jan 8 06:56:11 raspberrypi NetworkManager[2774]: <warn> Could not get scan request result: Did not receive a reply. Possible causes include: the remote application did not send a reply, the message bus security policy blocked the reply, the reply timeout expired, or the network connection was broken.
Jan 8 06:57:11 raspberrypi NetworkManager[2774]: <warn> Could not get scan request result: Did not receive a reply. Possible causes include: the remote application did not send a reply, the message bus security policy blocked the reply, the reply timeout expired, or the network connection was broken.
Jan 8 06:57:53 raspberrypi dhclient: DHCPREQUEST on br0 to 192.168.62.1 port 67
Jan 8 06:57:53 raspberrypi dhclient: DHCPACK from 192.168.62.1
Jan 8 06:57:54 raspberrypi dhclient: bound to 192.168.62.104 -- renewal in 350 seconds.
Jan 8 06:58:11 raspberrypi NetworkManager[2774]: <warn> Could not get scan request result: Did not receive a reply. Possible causes include: the remote application did not send a reply, the message bus security policy blocked the reply, the reply timeout expired, or the network connection was broken.
Jan 8 06:59:11 raspberrypi NetworkManager[2774]: <warn> Could not get scan request result: Did not receive a reply. Possible causes include: the remote application did not send a reply, the message bus security policy blocked the reply, the reply timeout expired, or the network connection was broken.
Jan 8 07:00:11 raspberrypi NetworkManager[2774]: <warn> Could not get scan request result: Did not receive a reply. Possible causes include: the remote application did not send a reply, the message bus security policy blocked the reply, the reply timeout expired, or the network connection was broken.
Jan 8 07:01:11 raspberrypi NetworkManager[2774]: <warn> Could not get scan request result: Did not receive a reply. Possible causes include: the remote application did not send a reply, the message bus security policy blocked the reply, the reply timeout expired, or the network connection was broken.
Jan 8 07:02:11 raspberrypi NetworkManager[2774]: <warn> Could not get scan request result: Did not receive a reply. Possible causes include: the remote application did not send a reply, the message bus security policy blocked the reply, the reply timeout expired, or the network connection was broken.
Jan 8 07:03:11 raspberrypi NetworkManager[2774]: <warn> Could not get scan request result: Did not receive a reply. Possible causes include: the remote application did not send a reply, the message bus security policy blocked the reply, the reply timeout expired, or the network connection was broken.
Jan 8 07:03:44 raspberrypi dhclient: DHCPREQUEST on br0 to 192.168.62.1 port 67
Jan 8 07:03:44 raspberrypi dhclient: DHCPACK from 192.168.62.1
Jan 8 07:03:44 raspberrypi dhclient: bound to 192.168.62.104 -- renewal in 419 seconds.
Jan 8 07:04:11 raspberrypi NetworkManager[2774]: <warn> Could not get scan request result: Did not receive a reply. Possible causes include: the remote application did not send a reply, the message bus security policy blocked the reply, the reply timeout expired, or the network connection was broken.
Jan 8 07:05:11 raspberrypi NetworkManager[2774]: <warn> Could not get scan request result: Did not receive a reply. Possible causes include: the remote application did not send a reply, the message bus security policy blocked the reply, the reply timeout expired, or the network connection was broken.
Jan 8 07:06:11 raspberrypi NetworkManager[2774]: <warn> Could not get scan request result: Did not receive a reply. Possible causes include: the remote application did not send a reply, the message bus security policy blocked the reply, the reply timeout expired, or the network connection was broken.
Jan 8 07:07:11 raspberrypi NetworkManager[2774]: <warn> Could not get scan request result: Did not receive a reply. Possible causes include: the remote application did not send a reply, the message bus security policy blocked the reply, the reply timeout expired, or the network connection was broken.
Jan 8 07:08:11 raspberrypi NetworkManager[2774]: <warn> Could not get scan request result: Did not receive a reply. Possible causes include: the remote application did not send a reply, the message bus security policy blocked the reply, the reply timeout expired, or the network connection was broken.
Jan 8 07:09:11 raspberrypi NetworkManager[2774]: <warn> Could not get scan request result: Did not receive a reply. Possible causes include: the remote application did not send a reply, the message bus security policy blocked the reply, the reply timeout expired, or the network connection was broken.
Jan 8 07:10:11 raspberrypi NetworkManager[2774]: <warn> Could not get scan request result: Did not receive a reply. Possible causes include: the remote application did not send a reply, the message bus security policy blocked the reply, the reply timeout expired, or the network connection was broken.
Jan 8 07:10:43 raspberrypi dhclient: DHCPREQUEST on br0 to 192.168.62.1 port 67
Jan 8 07:10:43 raspberrypi dhclient: DHCPACK from 192.168.62.1
Jan 8 07:10:43 raspberrypi dhclient: bound to 192.168.62.104 -- renewal in 368 seconds.
Jan 8 07:11:11 raspberrypi NetworkManager[2774]: <warn> Could not get scan request result: Did not receive a reply. Possible causes include: the remote application did not send a reply, the message bus security policy blocked the reply, the reply timeout expired, or the network connection was broken.
Jan 8 07:12:11 raspberrypi NetworkManager[2774]: <warn> Could not get scan request result: Did not receive a reply. Possible causes include: the remote application did not send a reply, the message bus security policy blocked the reply, the reply timeout expired, or the network connection was broken.
Jan 8 07:13:11 raspberrypi NetworkManager[2774]: <warn> Could not get scan request result: Did not receive a reply. Possible causes include: the remote application did not send a reply, the message bus security policy blocked the reply, the reply timeout expired, or the network connection was broken.
Jan 8 07:14:11 raspberrypi NetworkManager[2774]: <warn> Could not get scan request result: Did not receive a reply. Possible causes include: the remote application did not send a reply, the message bus security policy blocked the reply, the reply timeout expired, or the network connection was broken.
Jan 8 07:15:11 raspberrypi NetworkManager[2774]: <warn> Could not get scan request result: Did not receive a reply. Possible causes include: the remote application did not send a reply, the message bus security policy blocked the reply, the reply timeout expired, or the network connection was broken.
Jan 8 07:16:11 raspberrypi NetworkManager[2774]: <warn> Could not get scan request result: Did not receive a reply. Possible causes include: the remote application did not send a reply, the message bus security policy blocked the reply, the reply timeout expired, or the network connection was broken.
Jan 8 07:16:51 raspberrypi dhclient: DHCPREQUEST on br0 to 192.168.62.1 port 67
Jan 8 07:16:51 raspberrypi dhclient: DHCPACK from 192.168.62.1
Jan 8 07:16:52 raspberrypi dhclient: bound to 192.168.62.104 -- renewal in 385 seconds.
Jan 8 07:17:01 raspberrypi /USR/SBIN/CRON[10417]: (root) CMD ( cd / && run-parts --report /etc/cron.hourly)
Jan 8 07:17:11 raspberrypi NetworkManager[2774]: <warn> Could not get scan request result: Did not receive a reply. Possible causes include: the remote application did not send a reply, the message bus security policy blocked the reply, the reply timeout expired, or the network connection was broken.
Jan 8 07:18:11 raspberrypi NetworkManager[2774]: <warn> Could not get scan request result: Did not receive a reply. Possible causes include: the remote application did not send a reply, the message bus security policy blocked the reply, the reply timeout expired, or the network connection was broken.
Jan 8 07:19:11 raspberrypi NetworkManager[2774]: <warn> Could not get scan request result: Did not receive a reply. Possible causes include: the remote application did not send a reply, the message bus security policy blocked the reply, the reply timeout expired, or the network connection was broken.
Jan 8 07:18:04 raspberrypi kernel: imklog 5.8.11, log source = /proc/kmsg started.

(The last line is the first output of the rebooted machine – when, at about 7.19am I got up and found it wasn’t working – not sure why the clock goes backwards but it does.)

And here is yesterday’s log at the same time…


Jan 7 06:25:14 raspberrypi /USR/SBIN/CRON[8350]: (CRON) info (No MTA installed, discarding output)
Jan 7 06:26:05 raspberrypi dhclient: DHCPREQUEST on br0 to 192.168.62.1 port 67
Jan 7 06:26:05 raspberrypi dhclient: DHCPACK from 192.168.62.1
Jan 7 06:26:07 raspberrypi dhclient: bound to 192.168.62.104 -- renewal in 399 seconds.
Jan 7 06:32:46 raspberrypi dhclient: DHCPREQUEST on br0 to 192.168.62.1 port 67
Jan 7 06:32:46 raspberrypi dhclient: DHCPACK from 192.168.62.1
Jan 7 06:32:47 raspberrypi dhclient: bound to 192.168.62.104 -- renewal in 361 seconds.
Jan 7 06:38:48 raspberrypi dhclient: DHCPREQUEST on br0 to 192.168.62.1 port 67
Jan 7 06:38:48 raspberrypi dhclient: DHCPACK from 192.168.62.1
Jan 7 06:38:49 raspberrypi dhclient: bound to 192.168.62.104 -- renewal in 420 seconds.
Jan 7 06:41:27 raspberrypi kernel: [63555.391671] usb 1-1.3.1: reset high-speed USB device number 6 using dwc_otg
Jan 7 06:45:50 raspberrypi dhclient: DHCPREQUEST on br0 to 192.168.62.1 port 67
Jan 7 06:45:50 raspberrypi dhclient: DHCPACK from 192.168.62.1
Jan 7 06:45:50 raspberrypi dhclient: bound to 192.168.62.104 -- renewal in 354 seconds.
Jan 7 06:49:59 raspberrypi hostapd: wlan0: STA 7c:61:93:ff:98:0c IEEE 802.11: authentication OK (open system)
Jan 7 06:49:59 raspberrypi hostapd: wlan0: STA 7c:61:93:ff:98:0c MLME: MLME-AUTHENTICATE.indication(7c:61:93:ff:98:0c, OPEN_SYSTEM)
Jan 7 06:49:59 raspberrypi hostapd: wlan0: STA 7c:61:93:ff:98:0c MLME: MLME-DELETEKEYS.request(7c:61:93:ff:98:0c)
Jan 7 06:49:59 raspberrypi hostapd: wlan0: STA 7c:61:93:ff:98:0c IEEE 802.11: authenticated
Jan 7 06:49:59 raspberrypi hostapd: wlan0: STA 7c:61:93:ff:98:0c IEEE 802.11: association OK (aid 1)
Jan 7 06:49:59 raspberrypi hostapd: wlan0: STA 7c:61:93:ff:98:0c IEEE 802.11: associated (aid 1)
Jan 7 06:49:59 raspberrypi hostapd: wlan0: STA 7c:61:93:ff:98:0c MLME: MLME-ASSOCIATE.indication(7c:61:93:ff:98:0c)
Jan 7 06:49:59 raspberrypi hostapd: wlan0: STA 7c:61:93:ff:98:0c MLME: MLME-DELETEKEYS.request(7c:61:93:ff:98:0c)
Jan 7 06:51:22 raspberrypi NetworkManager[2763]: <warn> Could not get scan request result: Did not receive a reply. Possible causes include: the remote application did not send a reply, the message bus security policy blocked the reply, the reply timeout expired, or the network connection was broken.
Jan 7 06:51:45 raspberrypi dhclient: DHCPREQUEST on br0 to 192.168.62.1 port 67
Jan 7 06:51:45 raspberrypi dhclient: DHCPACK from 192.168.62.1
Jan 7 06:51:45 raspberrypi dhclient: bound to 192.168.62.104 -- renewal in 359 seconds.
Jan 7 06:52:22 raspberrypi NetworkManager[2763]: <warn> Could not get scan request result: Did not receive a reply. Possible causes include: the remote application did not send a reply, the message bus security policy blocked the reply, the reply timeout expired, or the network connection was broken.
Jan 7 06:53:22 raspberrypi NetworkManager[2763]: <warn> Could not get scan request result: Did not receive a reply. Possible causes include: the remote application did not send a reply, the message bus security policy blocked the reply, the reply timeout expired, or the network connection was broken.
Jan 7 06:54:22 raspberrypi NetworkManager[2763]: <warn> Could not get scan request result: Did not receive a reply. Possible causes include: the remote application did not send a reply, the message bus security policy blocked the reply, the reply timeout expired, or the network connection was broken.
Jan 7 06:55:22 raspberrypi NetworkManager[2763]: <warn> Could not get scan request result: Did not receive a reply. Possible causes include: the remote application did not send a reply, the message bus security policy blocked the reply, the reply timeout expired, or the network connection was broken.
Jan 7 06:56:22 raspberrypi NetworkManager[2763]: <warn> Could not get scan request result: Did not receive a reply. Possible causes include: the remote application did not send a reply, the message bus security policy blocked the reply, the reply timeout expired, or the network connection was broken.
Jan 7 06:57:22 raspberrypi NetworkManager[2763]: <warn> Could not get scan request result: Did not receive a reply. Possible causes include: the remote application did not send a reply, the message bus security policy blocked the reply, the reply timeout expired, or the network connection was broken.
Jan 7 06:57:45 raspberrypi dhclient: DHCPREQUEST on br0 to 192.168.62.1 port 67
Jan 7 06:57:45 raspberrypi dhclient: DHCPACK from 192.168.62.1
Jan 7 06:57:45 raspberrypi dhclient: bound to 192.168.62.104 -- renewal in 369 seconds.
Jan 7 06:58:22 raspberrypi NetworkManager[2763]: <warn> Could not get scan request result: Did not receive a reply. Possible causes include: the remote application did not send a reply, the message bus security policy blocked the reply, the reply timeout expired, or the network connection was broken.
Jan 7 06:59:22 raspberrypi NetworkManager[2763]: <warn> Could not get scan request result: Did not receive a reply. Possible causes include: the remote application did not send a reply, the message bus security policy blocked the reply, the reply timeout expired, or the network connection was broken.
Jan 7 07:00:22 raspberrypi NetworkManager[2763]: <warn> Could not get scan request result: Did not receive a reply. Possible causes include: the remote application did not send a reply, the message bus security policy blocked the reply, the reply timeout expired, or the network connection was broken.
Jan 7 07:01:22 raspberrypi NetworkManager[2763]: <warn> Could not get scan request result: Did not receive a reply. Possible causes include: the remote application did not send a reply, the message bus security policy blocked the reply, the reply timeout expired, or the network connection was broken.
Jan 7 07:02:22 raspberrypi NetworkManager[2763]: <warn> Could not get scan request result: Did not receive a reply. Possible causes include: the remote application did not send a reply, the message bus security policy blocked the reply, the reply timeout expired, or the network connection was broken.
Jan 7 07:03:22 raspberrypi NetworkManager[2763]: <warn> Could not get scan request result: Did not receive a reply. Possible causes include: the remote application did not send a reply, the message bus security policy blocked the reply, the reply timeout expired, or the network connection was broken.
Jan 7 07:03:54 raspberrypi dhclient: DHCPREQUEST on br0 to 192.168.62.1 port 67
Jan 7 07:03:54 raspberrypi dhclient: DHCPACK from 192.168.62.1
Jan 7 07:03:54 raspberrypi dhclient: bound to 192.168.62.104 -- renewal in 366 seconds.
Jan 7 07:04:22 raspberrypi NetworkManager[2763]: <warn> Could not get scan request result: Did not receive a reply. Possible causes include: the remote application did not send a reply, the message bus security policy blocked the reply, the reply timeout expired, or the network connection was broken.
Jan 7 07:05:22 raspberrypi NetworkManager[2763]: <warn> Could not get scan request result: Did not receive a reply. Possible causes include: the remote application did not send a reply, the message bus security policy blocked the reply, the reply timeout expired, or the network connection was broken.
Jan 7 07:06:22 raspberrypi NetworkManager[2763]: <warn> Could not get scan request result: Did not receive a reply. Possible causes include: the remote application did not send a reply, the message bus security policy blocked the reply, the reply timeout expired, or the network connection was broken.
Jan 7 07:07:22 raspberrypi NetworkManager[2763]: <warn> Could not get scan request result: Did not receive a reply. Possible causes include: the remote application did not send a reply, the message bus security policy blocked the reply, the reply timeout expired, or the network connection was broken.
Jan 7 07:08:22 raspberrypi NetworkManager[2763]: <warn> Could not get scan request result: Did not receive a reply. Possible causes include: the remote application did not send a reply, the message bus security policy blocked the reply, the reply timeout expired, or the network connection was broken.
Jan 7 07:09:22 raspberrypi NetworkManager[2763]: <warn> Could not get scan request result: Did not receive a reply. Possible causes include: the remote application did not send a reply, the message bus security policy blocked the reply, the reply timeout expired, or the network connection was broken.
Jan 7 07:10:00 raspberrypi dhclient: DHCPREQUEST on br0 to 192.168.62.1 port 67
Jan 7 07:10:00 raspberrypi dhclient: DHCPACK from 192.168.62.1
Jan 7 07:10:00 raspberrypi dhclient: bound to 192.168.62.104 -- renewal in 397 seconds.
Jan 7 07:10:22 raspberrypi NetworkManager[2763]: <warn> Could not get scan request result: Did not receive a reply. Possible causes include: the remote application did not send a reply, the message bus security policy blocked the reply, the reply timeout expired, or the network connection was broken.
Jan 7 07:11:22 raspberrypi NetworkManager[2763]: <warn> Could not get scan request result: Did not receive a reply. Possible causes include: the remote application did not send a reply, the message bus security policy blocked the reply, the reply timeout expired, or the network connection was broken.
Jan 7 07:12:22 raspberrypi NetworkManager[2763]: <warn> Could not get scan request result: Did not receive a reply. Possible causes include: the remote application did not send a reply, the message bus security policy blocked the reply, the reply timeout expired, or the network connection was broken.
Jan 7 07:13:22 raspberrypi NetworkManager[2763]: <warn> Could not get scan request result: Did not receive a reply. Possible causes include: the remote application did not send a reply, the message bus security policy blocked the reply, the reply timeout expired, or the network connection was broken.
Jan 7 07:14:22 raspberrypi NetworkManager[2763]: <warn> Could not get scan request result: Did not receive a reply. Possible causes include: the remote application did not send a reply, the message bus security policy blocked the reply, the reply timeout expired, or the network connection was broken.
Jan 7 07:15:22 raspberrypi NetworkManager[2763]: <warn> Could not get scan request result: Did not receive a reply. Possible causes include: the remote application did not send a reply, the message bus security policy blocked the reply, the reply timeout expired, or the network connection was broken.
Jan 7 07:16:22 raspberrypi NetworkManager[2763]: <warn> Could not get scan request result: Did not receive a reply. Possible causes include: the remote application did not send a reply, the message bus security policy blocked the reply, the reply timeout expired, or the network connection was broken.
Jan 7 07:16:37 raspberrypi dhclient: DHCPREQUEST on br0 to 192.168.62.1 port 67
Jan 7 07:16:37 raspberrypi dhclient: DHCPACK from 192.168.62.1
Jan 7 07:16:38 raspberrypi dhclient: bound to 192.168.62.104 -- renewal in 435 seconds.
Jan 7 07:17:01 raspberrypi /USR/SBIN/CRON[8725]: (root) CMD ( cd / && run-parts --report /etc/cron.hourly)
Jan 7 07:17:22 raspberrypi NetworkManager[2763]: <warn> Could not get scan request result: Did not receive a reply. Possible causes include: the remote application did not send a reply, the message bus security policy blocked the reply, the reply timeout expired, or the network connection was broken.
Jan 7 07:18:22 raspberrypi NetworkManager[2763]: <warn> Could not get scan request result: Did not receive a reply. Possible causes include: the remote application did not send a reply, the message bus security policy blocked the reply, the reply timeout expired, or the network connection was broken.
Jan 7 07:19:22 raspberrypi NetworkManager[2763]: <warn> Could not get scan request result: Did not receive a reply. Possible causes include: the remote application did not send a reply, the message bus security policy blocked the reply, the reply timeout expired, or the network connection was broken.
Jan 7 07:20:22 raspberrypi NetworkManager[2763]: <warn> Could not get scan request result: Did not receive a reply. Possible causes include: the remote application did not send a reply, the message bus security policy blocked the reply, the reply timeout expired, or the network connection was broken.
Jan 7 07:21:22 raspberrypi NetworkManager[2763]: <warn> Could not get scan request result: Did not receive a reply. Possible causes include: the remote application did not send a reply, the message bus security policy blocked the reply, the reply timeout expired, or the network connection was broken.
Jan 7 07:22:22 raspberrypi NetworkManager[2763]: <warn> Could not get scan request result: Did not receive a reply. Possible causes include: the remote application did not send a reply, the message bus security policy blocked the reply, the reply timeout expired, or the network connection was broken.
Jan 7 07:23:22 raspberrypi NetworkManager[2763]: <warn> Could not get scan request result: Did not receive a reply. Possible causes include: the remote application did not send a reply, the message bus security policy blocked the reply, the reply timeout expired, or the network connection was broken.

Jan 7 07:23:53 raspberrypi dhclient: DHCPREQUEST on br0 to 192.168.62.1 port 67
Jan 7 07:23:53 raspberrypi dhclient: DHCPACK from 192.168.62.1
Jan 7 07:23:54 raspberrypi dhclient: bound to 192.168.62.104 -- renewal in 389 seconds.
Jan 7 07:24:22 raspberrypi NetworkManager[2763]: <warn> Could not get scan request result: Did not receive a reply. Possible causes include: the remote application did not send a reply, the message bus security policy blocked the reply, the reply timeout expired, or the network connection was broken.
Jan 7 07:25:22 raspberrypi NetworkManager[2763]: <warn> Could not get scan request result: Did not receive a reply. Possible causes include: the remote application did not send a reply, the message bus security policy blocked the reply, the reply timeout expired, or the network connection was broken.
Jan 7 07:26:22 raspberrypi NetworkManager[2763]: <warn> Could not get scan request result: Did not receive a reply. Possible causes include: the remote application did not send a reply, the message bus security policy blocked the reply, the reply timeout expired, or the network connection was broken.
Jan 7 07:27:22 raspberrypi NetworkManager[2763]: <warn> Could not get scan request result: Did not receive a reply. Possible causes include: the remote application did not send a reply, the message bus security policy blocked the reply, the reply timeout expired, or the network connection was broken.
Jan 7 07:28:22 raspberrypi NetworkManager[2763]: <warn> Could not get scan request result: Did not receive a reply. Possible causes include: the remote application did not send a reply, the message bus security policy blocked the reply, the reply timeout expired, or the network connection was broken.
Jan 7 07:29:22 raspberrypi NetworkManager[2763]: <warn> Could not get scan request result: Did not receive a reply. Possible causes include: the remote application did not send a reply, the message bus security policy blocked the reply, the reply timeout expired, or the network connection was broken.
Jan 7 07:30:22 raspberrypi NetworkManager[2763]: <warn> Could not get scan request result: Did not receive a reply. Possible causes include: the remote application did not send a reply, the message bus security policy blocked the reply, the reply timeout expired, or the network connection was broken.
Jan 7 07:30:23 raspberrypi dhclient: DHCPREQUEST on br0 to 192.168.62.1 port 67
Jan 7 07:30:23 raspberrypi dhclient: DHCPACK from 192.168.62.1
Jan 7 07:30:23 raspberrypi dhclient: bound to 192.168.62.104 -- renewal in 382 seconds.
Jan 7 07:31:22 raspberrypi NetworkManager[2763]: <warn> Could not get scan request result: Did not receive a reply. Possible causes include: the remote application did not send a reply, the message bus security policy blocked the reply, the reply timeout expired, or the network connection was broken.
Jan 7 07:32:22 raspberrypi NetworkManager[2763]: <warn> Could not get scan request result: Did not receive a reply. Possible causes include: the remote application did not send a reply, the message bus security policy blocked the reply, the reply timeout expired, or the network connection was broken.
Jan 7 07:33:22 raspberrypi NetworkManager[2763]: <warn> Could not get scan request result: Did not receive a reply. Possible causes include: the remote application did not send a reply, the message bus security policy blocked the reply, the reply timeout expired, or the network connection was broken.
Jan 7 07:34:22 raspberrypi NetworkManager[2763]: <warn> Could not get scan request result: Did not receive a reply. Possible causes include: the remote application did not send a reply, the message bus security policy blocked the reply, the reply timeout expired, or the network connection was broken.
Jan 7 07:35:22 raspberrypi NetworkManager[2763]: <warn> Could not get scan request result: Did not receive a reply. Possible causes include: the remote application did not send a reply, the message bus security policy blocked the reply, the reply timeout expired, or the network connection was broken.
Jan 7 07:36:22 raspberrypi NetworkManager[2763]: <warn> Could not get scan request result: Did not receive a reply. Possible causes include: the remote application did not send a reply, the message bus security policy blocked the reply, the reply timeout expired, or the network connection was broken.
Jan 7 07:36:45 raspberrypi dhclient: DHCPREQUEST on br0 to 192.168.62.1 port 67
Jan 7 07:36:45 raspberrypi dhclient: DHCPACK from 192.168.62.1
Jan 7 07:36:46 raspberrypi dhclient: bound to 192.168.62.104 -- renewal in 375 seconds.
Jan 7 07:37:22 raspberrypi NetworkManager[2763]: <warn> Could not get scan request result: Did not receive a reply. Possible causes include: the remote application did not send a reply, the message bus security policy blocked the reply, the reply timeout expired, or the network connection was broken.
Jan 7 07:38:22 raspberrypi NetworkManager[2763]: <warn> Could not get scan request result: Did not receive a reply. Possible causes include: the remote application did not send a reply, the message bus security policy blocked the reply, the reply timeout expired, or the network connection was broken.
Jan 7 07:39:22 raspberrypi NetworkManager[2763]: <warn> Could not get scan request result: Did not receive a reply. Possible causes include: the remote application did not send a reply, the message bus security policy blocked the reply, the reply timeout expired, or the network connection was broken.
Jan 7 07:40:22 raspberrypi NetworkManager[2763]: <warn> Could not get scan request result: Did not receive a reply. Possible causes include: the remote application did not send a reply, the message bus security policy blocked the reply, the reply timeout expired, or the network connection was broken.
Jan 7 07:41:22 raspberrypi NetworkManager[2763]: <warn> Could not get scan request result: Did not receive a reply. Possible causes include: the remote application did not send a reply, the message bus security policy blocked the reply, the reply timeout expired, or the network connection was broken.
Jan 7 07:42:22 raspberrypi NetworkManager[2763]: <warn> Could not get scan request result: Did not receive a reply. Possible causes include: the remote application did not send a reply, the message bus security policy blocked the reply, the reply timeout expired, or the network connection was broken.
Jan 7 07:43:02 raspberrypi dhclient: DHCPREQUEST on br0 to 192.168.62.1 port 67
Jan 7 07:43:02 raspberrypi dhclient: DHCPACK from 192.168.62.1
Jan 7 07:43:02 raspberrypi dhclient: bound to 192.168.62.104 -- renewal in 439 seconds.
Jan 7 07:43:22 raspberrypi NetworkManager[2763]: <warn> Could not get scan request result: Did not receive a reply. Possible causes include: the remote application did not send a reply, the message bus security policy blocked the reply, the reply timeout expired, or the network connection was broken.
Jan 7 07:44:22 raspberrypi NetworkManager[2763]: <warn> Could not get scan request result: Did not receive a reply. Possible causes include: the remote application did not send a reply, the message bus security policy blocked the reply, the reply timeout expired, or the network connection was broken.
Jan 7 07:45:22 raspberrypi NetworkManager[2763]: <warn> Could not get scan request result: Did not receive a reply. Possible causes include: the remote application did not send a reply, the message bus security policy blocked the reply, the reply timeout expired, or the network connection was broken.
Jan 7 07:46:22 raspberrypi NetworkManager[2763]: <warn> Could not get scan request result: Did not receive a reply. Possible causes include: the remote application did not send a reply, the message bus security policy blocked the reply, the reply timeout expired, or the network connection was broken.
Jan 7 07:47:22 raspberrypi NetworkManager[2763]: <warn> Could not get scan request result: Did not receive a reply. Possible causes include: the remote application did not send a reply, the message bus security policy blocked the reply, the reply timeout expired, or the network connection was broken.
Jan 7 07:48:22 raspberrypi NetworkManager[2763]: <warn> Could not get scan request result: Did not receive a reply. Possible causes include: the remote application did not send a reply, the message bus security policy blocked the reply, the reply timeout expired, or the network connection was broken.
Jan 7 07:49:22 raspberrypi NetworkManager[2763]: <warn> Could not get scan request result: Did not receive a reply. Possible causes include: the remote application did not send a reply, the message bus security policy blocked the reply, the reply timeout expired, or the network connection was broken.
Jan 7 07:50:21 raspberrypi dhclient: DHCPREQUEST on br0 to 192.168.62.1 port 67
Jan 7 07:50:21 raspberrypi dhclient: DHCPACK from 192.168.62.1
Jan 7 07:50:22 raspberrypi dhclient: bound to 192.168.62.104 -- renewal in 418 seconds.
Jan 7 07:50:23 raspberrypi NetworkManager[2763]: <warn> Could not get scan request result: Did not receive a reply. Possible causes include: the remote application did not send a reply, the message bus security policy blocked the reply, the reply timeout expired, or the network connection was broken.
Jan 7 07:51:22 raspberrypi NetworkManager[2763]: <warn> Could not get scan request result: Did not receive a reply. Possible causes include: the remote application did not send a reply, the message bus security policy blocked the reply, the reply timeout expired, or the network connection was broken.
Jan 7 07:52:22 raspberrypi NetworkManager[2763]: <warn> Could not get scan request result: Did not receive a reply. Possible causes include: the remote application did not send a reply, the message bus security policy blocked the reply, the reply timeout expired, or the network connection was broken.
Jan 7 07:53:22 raspberrypi NetworkManager[2763]: <warn> Could not get scan request result: Did not receive a reply. Possible causes include: the remote application did not send a reply, the message bus security policy blocked the reply, the reply timeout expired, or the network connection was broken.
Jan 7 07:17:55 raspberrypi kernel: imklog 5.8.11, log source = /proc/kmsg started.

As you can see, I didn’t reboot it yesterday until a bit later (I was puzzled as to why I could still ping the bridge but not log in to the box – but this morning I had seen it al before.)

As the logs up to time 6.49am show no sign of a problem I am guessing this is a cron related issue.

But I can see nothing in the various cron.daily scripts that should hit the wireless card.

Any ideas as to what this is about?

Plan9 on the Raspberry Pi


Glenda, the Plan 9 Bunny
Glenda, the Plan 9 Bunny (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

Plan 9 from Bell Labs” was meant to be the successor system to Unix and like the original was designed and built by AT&Ts engineers at Bell Labs(the title is, of course, a skit on what is supposedly the best worst-ever film – “Plan 9 from Outer Space”).

Plan 9 never really made it. Linux came along and gave us Unix for the masses on cheap hardware for free and the world moved on. (Though some of the ideas in Plan 9 were retro-fitted into Linux and other Unix-like systems.)

The increased speed of commodity computers – latterly sustained via SMP – meant that computing power that once seemed only available to the elite could be found on the High Street and easy to use and install clustering software meant scientists and others could build super-computers using cheap hardware and free software. The multi-computer idea at the heart of Plan 9 seemed to have been passed-by as we screamed along the Moore’s Law Highway.

But now Moore’s Law is breaking down – or rather we are discovering that while the Law continues to apply – in other words we can still double the number of transistors on silicon every 18 – 24 months – other factors (heat dissipation essentially) mean we cannot translate a doubling of transistors into a computer that runs twice as fast. And so the multi-computer idea is of interest once more.

Plan 9 is not likely to be the operating system of the future. But as an actually existing multi-computer operating system it could still have a lot to teach us.

Now it has been ported to run on the Raspberry Pi single board computer I have decided to order another three of these things (I already have one running as a proxy server) and use them as Plan 9 nodes. The boards should be here in about three weeks (I hope), meaning I will have them as a Christmas present to myself.

Missing coding


English: Programmer
English: Programmer (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

Ever been engaged in an intellectual activity where the hours whizz by much faster than you think, as you puzzle over and round the issues while feeling an intense pleasure that makes the rest of the world seem less important?  This what is called “flow” and, generally, it is what I feel when I am coding.

I am not the world’s greatest coder, to be honest I am little better than average (though doing the MSc at Birkbeck made me so much better than I used to be). The pleasure doesn’t come from having a natural skill that means I can write hundreds of lines at a single sitting: like a typical programmer, if I got 20 fully debugged lines out a day, every day, I would count that as decent performance.

But lately I haven’t done any coding at all (apart from a few lines of scripting in the office to ensure SMB mounts are automatic and such like). Instead I have read a lot of computer science papers and spent a lot of time working on a presentation I need to make and a literature review that will come after.

But I miss the coding, and I am missing it more every day.

Now, coding is also very more-ish. If you code to scratch an itch then chances are you make yourself itchy by coding. So earlier this year I wrote a Groovy/Java hex editor – Hexxed – after I wrote a Linux filesystem where I could not find a hex editor that did what I wanted to do, and so on.

So, even as I puzzle about whether I should write some code just for the sake of a mental stretch, I also wonder what I would write.

Uses for a Raspberry Pi


Raspberry Pi
Raspberry Pi (Photo credit: CesarCardoso)

I think I have found a permanent use for my Raspberry Pi – replacing what was once my utility (squid proxy, web, email, ntp, smb, dns) server.

This was a commodity desktop box, first built in 2005, running Ubuntu desktop server (I built it before the server version was available). Earlier this year it suffered some sort of hardware failure and became very ill and I finally switched off about a month ago. By then all the other users in the house had stopped using the proxy, which was the main benefit, as it was so unreliable.

So far I have only implemented the proxy (though ntp comes ‘for free’ via the raspbian distribution) and it seems fine. I have a 1TB USB disk attached to it so have plenty of space to get the other stuff done too.

 

The year of Linux on the desktop?


KDE 4 Current version: 4.7 Older versions: 4.0...
KDE 4 Current version: 4.7 Older versions: 4.0 beta 2, 4.0 beta 3, 4.0 beta 4, 4.0 RC2, 4.0 final, 4.1, 4.2, 4.3, 4.4, 4.5, 4.6 (see file history) (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

For many who work or research in the industry, desktop computers have an “end of history” feel about them.

The improvements in technology that allow chip makers to double the number of transistors in a given area of silicon every 18 – 24 months are still there but “Moore’s Law” as we understand it – ie., that computers will get twice as fast every 18 – 24 months – has broken down. We simply cannot power the chips (or rather keep them cool while supplying them with the power they need) and while parallelisation (ie “manycore”) means manufacturers can lower power demands and, to some extent, keep the speed of machines rising, it too is hitting a fundamental barrier – the inability of commodity hardware to supply instructions and data from memory fast enough to serve many more than 4 – 8 cores.

All this suggests that we might be close to “peak desktop” or to put it another way, the desktop computer you have now is not much slower than the one you will have in ten years time (unless, that is, you shell out quite a lot more for some fancy memory architecture or some other technological advance changes the rules.)

But what I think is clear is that you will have a desktop computer in a decade’s time, though it may look a bit more like today’s laptops: smaller, lighter, devices are going to be easier to deliver than faster ones. Tablets and other small form factor devices are useful for browsing the internet or writing a 140 character message, but who they are not the ideal devices for writing a 5, 10 or 100 page document on.

But if we are only going to buy one or at most two new desktop devices in the next decade then the business model of Microsoft – which still utterly dominates this space – is broken. No new desktops means no new sales of Office, the big money spinner for Microsoft.  Their response has been to compete for tablet and phone sales with Apple, though they start from a long way behind and, now, to lever their near-monopoly on general-use operating systems to seize control of all of the software on desktop.

Their plan to demand complete control over the desktop may yet fall foul of the regulators – it is difficult to see the European Commission nodding this one through, for instance. But there are other responses available.

Microsoft got clobbered in two ways when they previously tried to lock up one aspect of the software ecosystem – the browser. For sure, regulators put the squeeze on, but long before then users developed a far more effective way of breaking free – they switched to Mozilla Firefox.

Now the battle is much bigger. Microsoft are not just trying to control your browser, but all the other software on your machine. They will say they will still let others manufacture software and they are just supplying quality control – but would you really agree to the only books being available for sale those that were approved by Amazon (sadly, the evidence from the ebook market suggests that many of you would!)?

And what if Windows 9 removes all support for non-approved software (no doubt in the name of virus suppression or trojan elimination?) The behaviour of Apple fanatics shows there are plenty willing to welcome their new all-controlling overlords. But there is an alternative – whisper it – Linux on the desktop.

Now that very phrase – “Linux on the desktop” – has an internet meme-like jokey feel to it. It’s the gallows humour phrase of the free software world. If Linus Torvalds were ever to be led to the scaffold for crimes against intellectual property robber barons his last words would no doubt be “this is the year of Linux on the desktop” – but maybe the moment has come to find a generation of “second adopters” who are willing to break out of Microsoft’s jail?

The pace of development of the Linux kernel has not slowed, but there is a less excited feel to it all these days: Thermidor came to this revolution some time ago, but that is also a sign of its maturity.

After all, there is still no stopping an idea whose time has come.

It’s Friday afternoon…


…and I could really do with an answer to this question I have posted over on “Superuser”:

 

 

I am seeking to back up an encrypted volume used by Virtual Box on one OS X machine to another using rsync (I will eventually stick this into cron).

This is the command line (I am sharing public keys so no password is required) – with some details obscured:

rsync –bwlimit=100 -av -e “scp -P [port numb] user@address:~/VirtualBox\ VMs/ubuntu1/*” ./ubuntu1/.

But it won’t copy anything, just repeatedly giving me this, ie no copying is done – despite the fact that ubuntu1.vdi date stamp and size have now changed:

building file list … done drwxr-xr-x 170 2012/10/04 19:06:15 . -rw——- 7265 2012/10/05 10:00:21 ubuntu1.vbox -rw——- 7265 2012/10/05 10:00:21 ubuntu1.vbox-prev -rw——- 7881625600 2012/10/05 10:53:23 ubuntu1.vdi

sent 132 bytes received 20 bytes 304.00 bytes/sec total size is 7881640130 speedup is 51852895.59

How do get this to work properly?

Further reflections on the Raspberry Pi


I don’t want to be like a wet blanket – I really love the Raspberry Pi and the idea you can get a bare bones but entirely functional computer for less than thirty quid and hook it up to your HD TV with a £1.50 HDMI cable.Raspberry Pi on HD TV

But, having spent the day trying to get it to do some pretty basic things – like play some video or audio – I have to say that a lot of educationalists seem to be vesting far too much hope in what is, after all, a testing board.

It’s true that you can boot the thing up quickly and easily and that it comes with Scratch (though I haven’t tested that, yet). But I suspect most kids will get frustrated very quickly with it when they find it cannot do lots of things on the internet that they take for granted.

Using it is like regressing a decade or so in the Linux experience – lots of things don’t work (I still have not got mine to play any sound via the HDMI cable) or the software is not (yet) available.

I could see how it could be a low spec web server (after all I got a Dreamcast to be one of those) or a management board for NAS, and I’d love to play around with the GPIO stuff, but I would worry that many children would be put off if things that they expect their programs to do just do not happen because of some problems with the drivers.

The idea is a very sound one, though, and I am sure that in six months time it will be worth considering, but I wouldn’t bet my ICT budget on a fleet of these things yet.

(In my own case my idea, that I could use the board as a micro alternative to a projector by having it display presentations and video on our office HD TVs is on hold for now, as the software is just not available as far as I can see.)

Thrash reduction no longer a priority for Linux kernel devs?


Version 3.5 of the Linux kernel has been released.

freshly installed ipod linux, booting. during ...
freshly installed ipod linux, booting. during Wikipedia:Workshop Köln (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

One of the changes it includes is the removal of the “swap token” code – one of the very few ‘local’ memory management policies grafted on to the ‘global’ page replacement mechanisms in the kernel.

There are various technical reasons offered for the removal of the code – on which I am not qualified to comment – but the borrow line is that it was broken in any case, so the removal seems to make sense.

What does slightly disturb me, though, is the comment that Rik Van Riel, the key figure in kernel memory management code, makes:

The days of sub-1G memory systems with heavy use of swap are over.
If we ever need thrashing reducing code in the future, we will have to
implement something that does scale.

I think the days of sub-1G systems are far from over. In fact I suspect there are more of them, and more of them running Linux, than ever before and that trend is not going to stop.

He’s right of course about the need to find that code that works – my own efforts (in my MSc report) didn’t crack this problem, but I do think there is more that can be done.

Running BASIC on the Raspberry Pi


Actually, I ran BINSIC, my very own dialect of BASIC on the Raspberry Pi – it is very slow (a bit slower even than a ZX81 back in the day) but it does work.Raspberry Pi running

Haven’t had a chance to investigate what happens if I tweak the settings on the thing – possibly I might be able to speed execution up. Could be that Java and Groovy is just too much bloat, could be that BINSIC just demands a lot of computation (I refuse to consider that it might be poorly designed and executed).

Dmesg from Raspberry Pi


Sadly could not get it to work with the video cable I had, so work colleagues will have to wait to see this thing put through its paces, but it boots headless.

[ 0.000000] Initializing cgroup subsys cpu
[ 0.000000] Linux version 3.1.9+ (dc4@dc4-arm-01) (gcc version 4.5.1 (Broadcom-2708) ) #168 PREEMPT Sat Jul 14 18:56:31 BST 2012
[ 0.000000] CPU: ARMv6-compatible processor [410fb767] revision 7 (ARMv7), cr=00c5387d
[ 0.000000] CPU: VIPT nonaliasing data cache, VIPT nonaliasing instruction cache
[ 0.000000] Machine: BCM2708
[ 0.000000] Memory policy: ECC disabled, Data cache writeback
[ 0.000000] On node 0 totalpages: 49152
[ 0.000000] free_area_init_node: node 0, pgdat c05f7c4c, node_mem_map c06c8000
[ 0.000000] Normal zone: 384 pages used for memmap
[ 0.000000] Normal zone: 0 pages reserved
[ 0.000000] Normal zone: 48768 pages, LIFO batch:15
[ 0.000000] pcpu-alloc: s0 r0 d32768 u32768 alloc=1*32768
[ 0.000000] pcpu-alloc: [0] 0
[ 0.000000] Built 1 zonelists in Zone order, mobility grouping on. Total pages: 48768
[ 0.000000] Kernel command line: dma.dmachans=0x3c bcm2708_fb.fbwidth=656 bcm2708_fb.fbheight=416 bcm2708.boardrev=0x2 bcm2708.serial=0x5321aa64 smsc95xx.macaddr=B8:27:EB:21:AA:64 dwc_otg.lpm_enable=0 console=ttyAMA0,115200 kgdboc=ttyAMA0,115200 console=tty1 root=/dev/mmcblk0p2 rootfstype=ext4 elevator=deadline rootwait
[ 0.000000] PID hash table entries: 1024 (order: 0, 4096 bytes)
[ 0.000000] Dentry cache hash table entries: 32768 (order: 5, 131072 bytes)
[ 0.000000] Inode-cache hash table entries: 16384 (order: 4, 65536 bytes)
[ 0.000000] Memory: 192MB = 192MB total
[ 0.000000] Memory: 187880k/187880k available, 8728k reserved, 0K highmem
[ 0.000000] Virtual kernel memory layout:
[ 0.000000] vector : 0xffff0000 – 0xffff1000 ( 4 kB)
[ 0.000000] fixmap : 0xfff00000 – 0xfffe0000 ( 896 kB)
[ 0.000000] DMA : 0xffc00000 – 0xffe00000 ( 2 MB)
[ 0.000000] vmalloc : 0xcc800000 – 0xd8000000 ( 184 MB)
[ 0.000000] lowmem : 0xc0000000 – 0xcc000000 ( 192 MB)
[ 0.000000] modules : 0xbf000000 – 0xc0000000 ( 16 MB)
[ 0.000000] .text : 0xc0008000 – 0xc05943d0 (5681 kB)
[ 0.000000] .init : 0xc0595000 – 0xc05c7000 ( 200 kB)
[ 0.000000] .data : 0xc05c8000 – 0xc05f93b8 ( 197 kB)
[ 0.000000] .bss : 0xc05f93dc – 0xc06c7504 ( 825 kB)
[ 0.000000] NR_IRQS:245
[ 0.000000] timer_set_mode: unhandled mode:1
[ 0.000000] timer_set_mode: unhandled mode:3
[ 0.000000] Console: colour dummy device 80×30
[ 0.000000] console [tty1] enabled
[ 3.008944] Calibrating delay loop… 697.95 BogoMIPS (lpj=3489792)
[ 3.067898] pid_max: default: 32768 minimum: 301
[ 3.068528] Mount-cache hash table entries: 512
[ 3.069184] Initializing cgroup subsys cpuacct
[ 3.069298] Initializing cgroup subsys devices
[ 3.069349] Initializing cgroup subsys freezer
[ 3.069394] Initializing cgroup subsys blkio
[ 3.069512] CPU: Testing write buffer coherency: ok
[ 3.069646] ftrace: allocating 14801 entries in 44 pages
[ 3.142643] hw perfevents: enabled with v6 PMU driver, 3 counters available
[ 3.144629] devtmpfs: initialized
[ 3.152379] NET: Registered protocol family 16
[ 3.154308] vc-mem: mm_vc_mem_phys_addr = 0x00000000
[ 3.154373] vc-mem: mm_vc_mem_size = 0x10000000 (256 MiB)
[ 3.154891] hw-breakpoint: found 6 breakpoint and 1 watchpoint registers.
[ 3.154964] hw-breakpoint: maximum watchpoint size is 4 bytes.
[ 3.155013] mailbox: Broadcom VideoCore Mailbox driver
[ 3.155125] bcm2708_vcio: mailbox at f200b880
[ 3.155233] bcm_power: Broadcom power driver
[ 3.155281] bcm_power_open() -> 0
[ 3.155314] bcm_power_request(0, 8)
[ 3.656009] bcm_mailbox_read -> 00000080, 0
[ 3.656055] bcm_power_request -> 0
[ 3.656088] Serial: AMBA PL011 UART driver
[ 3.656281] dev:f1: ttyAMA0 at MMIO 0x20201000 (irq = 83) is a PL011 rev3
[ 3.961991] console [ttyAMA0] enabled
[ 3.987793] bio: create slab at 0
[ 3.993362] SCSI subsystem initialized
[ 3.997412] usbcore: registered new interface driver usbfs
[ 4.003206] usbcore: registered new interface driver hub
[ 4.008839] usbcore: registered new device driver usb
[ 4.014995] Switching to clocksource stc
[ 4.024054] Switched to NOHz mode on CPU #0
[ 4.037751] FS-Cache: Loaded
[ 4.041143] CacheFiles: Loaded
[ 4.062678] NET: Registered protocol family 2
[ 4.067628] IP route cache hash table entries: 2048 (order: 1, 8192 bytes)
[ 4.076225] TCP established hash table entries: 8192 (order: 4, 65536 bytes)
[ 4.083753] TCP bind hash table entries: 8192 (order: 3, 32768 bytes)
[ 4.090454] TCP: Hash tables configured (established 8192 bind 8192)
[ 4.096838] TCP reno registered
[ 4.100049] UDP hash table entries: 256 (order: 0, 4096 bytes)
[ 4.105942] UDP-Lite hash table entries: 256 (order: 0, 4096 bytes)
[ 4.112808] NET: Registered protocol family 1
[ 4.118168] RPC: Registered named UNIX socket transport module.
[ 4.124352] RPC: Registered udp transport module.
[ 4.129129] RPC: Registered tcp transport module.
[ 4.133858] RPC: Registered tcp NFSv4.1 backchannel transport module.
[ 4.140699] bcm2708_dma: DMA manager at cc808000
[ 4.145463] bcm2708_gpio: bcm2708_gpio_probe c05d00e0
[ 4.151132] vc-mem: Videocore memory driver
[ 4.156232] audit: initializing netlink socket (disabled)
[ 4.161794] type=2000 audit(0.780:1): initialized
[ 4.273943] VFS: Disk quotas dquot_6.5.2
[ 4.278154] Dquot-cache hash table entries: 1024 (order 0, 4096 bytes)
[ 4.286181] FS-Cache: Netfs ‘nfs’ registered for caching
[ 4.292889] msgmni has been set to 366
[ 4.299441] io scheduler noop registered
[ 4.303417] io scheduler deadline registered (default)
[ 4.308775] io scheduler cfq registered
[ 4.313091] BCM2708FB: registering framebuffer (656×416@16)
[ 4.319455] bcm2708_fb_set_par info(cb8ec400) 656×416 (656×416), 0, 16
[ 4.324300] BCM2708FB: start = cc900000,4d385000 width=656, height=416, bpp=16, pitch=1312 size=545792 success=0
[ 4.328226] Console: switching to colour frame buffer device 82×26
[ 4.363081] BCM2708FB: register framebuffer (0)
[ 4.370756] kgdb: Registered I/O driver kgdboc.
[ 4.389840] brd: module loaded
[ 4.401655] loop: module loaded
[ 4.408070] vcos: [1]: vchiq_init_state: slot_zero = 0xffd80000, is_master = 0
[ 4.417984] vcos: [1]: vchiq_init_state: called
[ 4.425920] vcos: [1]: vchiq: initialised – version 2 (min 2), device 253.0
[ 4.436157] usbcore: registered new interface driver smsc95xx
[ 4.444401] cdc_ncm: 04-Aug-2011
[ 4.450190] usbcore: registered new interface driver cdc_ncm
[ 4.458183] dwc_otg: version 2.90b 6-MAY-2010 (platform bus)
[ 4.466607] Core Release: 2.80a
[ 4.472190] Setting default values for core params
[ 4.479410] Finished setting default values for core params
[ 4.487660] cc840008 -> 1
[ 4.692730] Using Buffer DMA mode
[ 4.698348] Periodic Transfer Interrupt Enhancement – disabled
[ 4.706568] Multiprocessor Interrupt Enhancement – disabled
[ 4.714606] dwc_otg bcm2708_usb: DWC OTG Controller
[ 4.722035] dwc_otg bcm2708_usb: new USB bus registered, assigned bus number 1
[ 4.731718] dwc_otg bcm2708_usb: irq 75, io mem 0x00000000
[ 4.739565] Init: Port Power? op_state=1
[ 4.745661] Init: Power Port (0)
[ 4.751275] usb usb1: New USB device found, idVendor=1d6b, idProduct=0002
[ 4.760478] usb usb1: New USB device strings: Mfr=3, Product=2, SerialNumber=1
[ 4.770048] usb usb1: Product: DWC OTG Controller
[ 4.776999] usb usb1: Manufacturer: Linux 3.1.9+ dwc_otg_hcd
[ 4.784974] usb usb1: SerialNumber: bcm2708_usb
[ 4.792912] hub 1-0:1.0: USB hub found
[ 4.798875] hub 1-0:1.0: 1 port detected
[ 4.805829] Module dwc_common_port init
[ 4.806233] usbcore: registered new interface driver uas
[ 4.813839] Initializing USB Mass Storage driver…
[ 4.821204] usbcore: registered new interface driver usb-storage
[ 4.829462] USB Mass Storage support registered.
[ 4.836535] usbcore: registered new interface driver libusual
[ 4.845075] mousedev: PS/2 mouse device common for all mice
[ 4.853041] cpuidle: using governor ladder
[ 4.859428] cpuidle: using governor menu
[ 4.865595] sdhci: Secure Digital Host Controller Interface driver
[ 4.874016] sdhci: Copyright(c) Pierre Ossman
[ 4.880758] bcm_power_open() -> 1
[ 4.886491] Registered led device: mmc0::
[ 4.887001] mmc0: SDHCI controller on BCM2708_Arasan [platform] using platform’s DMA
[ 4.899412] mmc0: BCM2708 SDHC host at 0x20300000 DMA 2 IRQ 77
[ 4.907624] sdhci-pltfm: SDHCI platform and OF driver helper
[ 4.915932] Registered led device: led0
[ 4.916420] usbcore: registered new interface driver usbhid
[ 4.925516] usbhid: USB HID core driver
[ 4.933397] TCP cubic registered
[ 4.938859] Initializing XFRM netlink socket
[ 4.945587] NET: Registered protocol family 17
[ 4.954648] Registering the dns_resolver key type
[ 4.967050] VFP support v0.3: implementor 41 architecture 1 part 20 variant b rev 5
[ 4.989569] Waiting for root device /dev/mmcblk0p2…
[ 5.022690] mmc0: problem reading SD Status register.
[ 5.047824] mmc0: new high speed SDHC card at address 0215
[ 5.069785] mmcblk0: mmc0:0215 APPSD 30.6 GiB
[ 5.078236] mmcblk0: p1 p2
[ 5.209561] usb 1-1: new high speed USB device number 2 using dwc_otg
[ 5.439438] usb 1-1: New USB device found, idVendor=0424, idProduct=9512
[ 5.448581] usb 1-1: New USB device strings: Mfr=0, Product=0, SerialNumber=0
[ 5.459482] hub 1-1:1.0: USB hub found
[ 5.465852] hub 1-1:1.0: 3 ports detected
[ 5.749161] usb 1-1.1: new high speed USB device number 3 using dwc_otg
[ 5.869564] usb 1-1.1: New USB device found, idVendor=0424, idProduct=ec00
[ 5.879263] usb 1-1.1: New USB device strings: Mfr=0, Product=0, SerialNumber=0
[ 5.892256] smsc95xx v1.0.4
[ 5.954590] smsc95xx 1-1.1:1.0: eth0: register ‘smsc95xx’ at usb-bcm2708_usb-1.1, smsc95xx USB 2.0 Ethernet, b8:27:eb:21:aa:64
[ 10.705547] EXT4-fs (mmcblk0p2): recovery complete
[ 10.715781] EXT4-fs (mmcblk0p2): mounted filesystem with ordered data mode. Opts: (null)
[ 10.729063] VFS: Mounted root (ext4 filesystem) on device 179:2.
[ 10.738931] Freeing init memory: 200K
[ 24.983111] EXT4-fs (mmcblk0p2): re-mounted. Opts: (null)
[ 25.326722] ### snd_bcm2835_alsa_probe c05d07a0 ############### PROBING FOR bcm2835 ALSA device (0):(1) ###############
[ 25.349304] Creating card…
[ 25.354678] Creating device/chip ..
[ 25.369822] Adding controls ..
[ 25.375202] Registering card ….
[ 25.396456] bcm2835 ALSA CARD CREATED!
[ 25.408425] ### BCM2835 ALSA driver init OK ###
[ 32.799926] smsc95xx 1-1.1:1.0: eth0: link up, 100Mbps, full-duplex, lpa 0x45E1
[ 38.998740] Adding 102396k swap on /var/swap. Priority:-1 extents:1 across:102396k SS